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Tag : MIT

by   -   September 20, 2014

IROS_WebcamMore pitches from the interactive sessions at IROS. See also Part 1.

by   -   September 8, 2014

At Carnegie Mellon University in the United States, robots roam the corridors, carrying out simple tasks for Professor Manuela Veloso and her team. These CoBots, or collaborative robots, can escort guests through the maze-like building, or carry packages from reception. If they realize they cannot perform part of a task, they will simply ask for help.

The impact of robotics is one of the technological “revolutions” that is on the agenda at the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting of the New Champions in Tianjin, China.

Read more by Josephine Moulds on the World Economic Forum Blog.

by   -   August 28, 2014

“The future ain’t what it used to be” – MIT professor of economics David Autor believes the media vastly oversells the degree to which technology will displace highly skilled workers.

by   -   August 28, 2014

 

New research coming out of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) suggests that letting robots have control over human tasks in manufacturing is not just more efficient — it’s actually preferred by workers.

While manufacturers have long recognized the benefits of automation in streamlining processes and freeing humans from tedious tasks, such as aisle-running, there’s always a concern that workers may feel devalued or even replaceable.

“In our research we were seeking to find that sweet spot for ensuring that the human workforce is both satisfied and productive,” says project lead Matthew Gombolay, a PhD student at CSAIL. “We discovered that the answer is to actually give machines more autonomy, if it helps people to work together more fluently with robot teammates.”

Read more by Adam Conner-Simons on MIT News.

by   -   August 28, 2014

In the near future, the package that you ordered online may be deposited at your doorstep by a drone: Last December, online retailer Amazon announced plans to explore drone-based delivery, suggesting that fleets of flying robots might serve as autonomous messengers that shuttle packages to customers within 30 minutes of an order.

To ensure safe, timely, and accurate delivery, drones would need to deal with a degree of uncertainty in responding to factors such as high winds, sensor measurement errors, or drops in fuel. But such “what-if” planning typically requires massive computation, which can be difficult to perform on the fly.

Now MIT researchers have come up with a two-pronged approach that significantly reduces the computation associated with lengthy delivery missions. The team first developed an algorithm that enables a drone to monitor aspects of its “health” in real time. With the algorithm, a drone can predict its fuel level and the condition of its propellers, cameras, and other sensors throughout a mission, and take proactive measures — for example, rerouting to a charging station — if needed.

Read more by Jennifer Chu on MIT News.

by   -   August 14, 2014

“This is the first time where they’ve self-folded such a complicated robotic structure,” says Ronald Fearing, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California at Berkeley, who has been following the MIT and Harvard researchers’ work. “Because they build it with the electronics on first, you can now choose which folds occur when. If you don’t have the electronics, then you’re limited to patterns where you heat up the whole thing and everything folds at once. So being able to do the timed sequence is a nice capability.”

Read more on MIT News

by   -   July 18, 2014

Researchers at MIT have developed a robot that enhances the grasping motion of the human hand. The device, worn around one’s wrist, works essentially like two extra fingers adjacent to the pinky and thumb. A novel control algorithm enables it to move in sync with the wearer’s fingers to grasp objects of various shapes and sizes. Wearing the robot, a user could use one hand to, for instance, hold the base of a bottle while twisting off its cap.

Read more by Jennifer Chu at MIT News

by ,   -   March 19, 2014

What looks like a fish, swims like a fish but isn’t a fish? The latest in soft-bodied robots created by team of engineers of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

by   -   May 16, 2013

You’re at a busy bar. You order your personalized cocktail through a smart phone app; a drink dispenser measures out the beverage according to your instructions and a Kuka robotic arm give it a shake (or stir), while another garnishes it with a slice of lemon; the made-to-order concoction is delivered to your waiting hand via a slick little ten-lane conveyor belt. 

by   -   March 26, 2013

Last Tuesday I had the pleasure of attending VLAB: Drones – The Commercial Era Takes Off at Stanford GSB. The event was truly fantastic and the panel was amazing. The moderator was Chris Anderson, former editor at Wired and CEO of 3D robotics. I’m really struck by how much he has become the face of the commercial drone industry.

by   -   December 5, 2012


Steve Rainwater of Robots.net has provided a more accessible, but still detailed account of the DARPA-sponsored work on programmable matter at MIT, with particular focus on the electropermanent wobble stepper motors which are expected to find many applications and which are now on an independent path to market.


See on robots.net

by   -   December 3, 2012



An MIT spin-off called Robot Rebuilt wants to build robot hands with human-like sensitivity.


See on www.gizmag.com

by   -   December 3, 2012


“The little device is called a milli-motein — a name melding its millimeter-sized components and a motorized design inspired by proteins, which naturally fold themselves into incredibly complex shapes. This minuscule robot may be a harbinger of future devices that could fold themselves up into almost any shape imaginable.”


See on web.mit.edu