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by   -   August 9, 2016
Michael Aeberhard: Automated Driving with ROS at BMW. Source: OSRF Blog
Michael Aeberhard: Automated Driving with ROS at BMW. Source: OSRF Blog

ROSCon is an annual conference focused on ROS, the Robot Operating System. Every year, hundreds of ROS developers of all skill levels and backgrounds, from industry to academia, come together to teach, learn, and show off their latest projects.

Here is the next set of posts from the OSRF blog, along with videos.

by   -   February 13, 2016


ROSCon is an annual conference focused on ROS, the Robot Operating System. Every year, hundreds of ROS developers of all skill levels and backgrounds, from industry to academia, come together to teach, learn, and show off their latest projects. ROSCon 2015 was held in Hamburg, Germany. Here’s a recap of the first videos posted on the OSRF blog.

by   -   January 19, 2016

A new book by Lentin Joseph, Mastering ROS for Robotics Programming, discusses advanced concepts in robotics and how to implement them using ROS. Readers will learn how to build models of complex robots, and how to simulate and interface their robots using the ROS MoveIt! and the ROS navigation stack. Just released this past December, this 481-page book is one of the most advanced books on ROS currently available.

by   -   January 7, 2016

There are magnificent tutorials about how to create plugins for Gazebo in the GazeboSim webpage. There are even some tutorials about how to create plugins for Gazebo + ROS, which show that there are several types of plugins (world, model, sensor, system, visual), and indicate how to create a plugin for a world-type plugin. But I recently I needed to create a plugin for a light detector and couldn't find a concrete example. Here's a how-to post showing you how I did it.

At eight years old, ROS is growing faster than ever. We're excited to see how brand new startups are taking advantage of ROS to develop useful, reliable robots. In 2015 alone, more than $150 million in VC funding was invested in businesses that use ROS. And that's just the companies we are aware of.

by   -   October 20, 2015

Fully autonomous robotics could be developed today if objects could tell a robot what they are, their purpose and how to utilize them. Liatris is a new open source project built with ROS. Its objective is to reliably read an object’s pose and identity without relying on vision. It presents an opportunity to rip down the barriers that prevent robotics from being present in our everyday lives.

by ,   -   October 14, 2015

Robots in Depth is a new video series featuring interviews with researchers, entrepreneurs, VC investors, and policy makers in robotics, hosted by Per Sjöborg. In this interview, Tully Foote -- ROS Platform Manager at the Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF) -- explains the benefits of open source in robotics and how ROS came to be an open standard.

by   -   September 23, 2015

The Advanced Robotic Systems Engineering Lab at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA recently flew fifty small autonomous planes together using ROS.

by   -   September 15, 2015

Erle-Spider is a drone with legs powered by Canonical’s new distribution for robots and IoT devices: Snappy Ubuntu Core. This computer with legs uses the Robot Operating System (ROS), and has been unleashed by Erle Robotics, a spanish startup focused on creating artificial brains for robots and drones. Now crowdfunding on Indiegogo.

by   -   September 1, 2015

Launched in 2009 by a group of Waterloo engineering students, Clearpath's unmistakeable bright yellow and black robots have become synonymous with unmanned vehicle research in university research labs around the world. Now, as the field of robotics matures, Clearpath is forging into industrial applications, too. We caught up with Clearpath's CTO Ryan Gariepy at the 2015 Field and Service Robotics conference (FSR), to talk about their roots in research, the role of ROS and open source in their business model, and the challenges and opportunities of launching a robotics startup in Canada.

by   -   June 9, 2015


A new book, Learning Robotics using Python, takes a different approach to teaching the Robotics Operating System (ROS). Written by Lentin Joseph, founder and CEO of Indian robotics startup Qbotics Labs, it enables you to learn by building an interactive, autonomous, mobile robot, and is the result of his research while designing the company’s autonomous robot prototype, Chefbot. It features Artificial Intelligence, vision capabilities, speech recognition and synthesis.

by   -   March 18, 2015


By Martin Cote

After working in the terminal, gazebo and RViz, it’s time for a change of pace. For this ROS101 tutorial we’ll be detailing the basics of creating your own rqt dashboard! A dashboard is a single rqt window with one or more plugins displayed in movable, re-sizable frames. Dashboards generally consist of a number of plugins that, in combination, provide a suite of UI capabilities for working with robots and robot data.

by   -   March 5, 2015

The newly published open-source project is designed to introduce high school students and the web development community to ROS, and allow them a fast track to experiencing its uses.

by   -   January 23, 2015

By Martin Cote

The Arduino family of micro controllers has quickly become a go-to board for hobbyists due to its ease of use. Often times roboticists must create communication protocols to allow their embedded hardware to communicate with a computer. One of the most powerful aspects of ROS is that it can communicate with a large variety of hardware. That’s where rosserial comes in! Rosserial is a general protocol for sending ROS messages over a serial interface, such as the UART on Arduino. This allows you to easily interface any sensors attached to Arduino into your ROS environment. Read on to learn more!

by   -   January 21, 2015


By Paul Bovbel

Udev is a device manager for Linux that dynamically creates and removes nodes for hardware devices. In short, it helps your computer find your robot easily. By default, hardware devices attached to your Linux (Ubuntu) PC will belong to the root user. This means that any programs (e.g. ROS nodes) running as an unpriveleged (i.e. not root) user will not be able to access them. On top of that, devices will receive names such as ttyACMx and ttyUSBx arbitrarily based on the order in which they were plugged in. Luckily, you can solve this, and more, with udev rules.

Ethical, social and legal issues
April 19, 2013

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