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Research & Innovation

by   -   February 24, 2017

Cassie is an advanced legged mobility robot. Created by Oregon State University spin-off, Agility Robotics, Cassie’s engineering team has big plans for this robot to assist rescuers in disaster relief and go the extra mile when delivering packages right to our doors, potentially helping to revolutionise the retail market.

by   -   February 22, 2017

Robotics undoubtedly has the potential to improve lives in the developing world. However, with limited budgets and expertise on the ground, putting this technology in place is no small task. Step forwards WeRobotics, a new Swiss/American NGO dedicated to meeting this goal through the creation of in-country ‘flying labs’. Co-founder Adam Klaptocz explains all.

Chances are that you’ve never given much thought to how insects walk, or what combination of leg movements–or gaits–is most stable or fastest, but, if like a group of scientists from Ramdya, Floreano and Ijspeert labs, NCCR Robotics, you are trying to create fast and robust robots, taking inspiration some of nature’s most agile movers might give you just the inspiration you need.

by   -   February 16, 2017

Kickstart, one of the largest multi-corporate accelerators, officially launches its second cohort with the inclusion of new regions and verticals, including robotics and intelligent systems

Felix Von Drigalski, of the Nara Institute of Science and Technology, introduces a versatile, open-source, two-finger gripper for textile manipulation that can sustain significant pushing loads in order to perform tucking tasks, using active perception.

by   -   February 9, 2017

Incorporating strategies from skilled human planners improves automatic planners’ performance.

Macrophage grabbing a bacterium (left, pink) and our artificial prey (right, green). Credit: Simone Schurle

Robotics, by definition, has been a discipline to aid other fields, such as manufacturing and space exploration. Over the past decade, it has become increasingly important in life sciences; a field that has been transformed by the convergence of insights and approaches from distinct scientific and technological disciplines. Robotics can help automate numerous processes — including repetitive tasks used in drug discovery, in vitro fertilization — and in lab bench work, such as analytical testing and preparation of chemical agents.

In our recent paper in Science Robotics, we show how robotics in the life sciences can also enable scientists to study and interrogate biological processes at the microscale in a dynamic and adaptive manner.

by   -   February 2, 2017
“Hydrogels are soft, wet, biocompatible, and can form more friendly interfaces with human organs,” says Xuanhe Zhao, associate professor of mechanical engineering and civil and environmental engineering at MIT. Photo: Hyunwoo Yuk/MIT Soft Active Materials Lab

Engineers at MIT have fabricated transparent, gel-based robots that move when water is pumped in and out of them. The bots can perform a number of fast, forceful tasks, including kicking a ball underwater, and grabbing and releasing a live fish.

Source: TERESA project
TERESA project. Photo credit: Claire Cocano

TERESA is a 3-year research project funded by the European Union and carried out by six institutions from four European countries. Its goal is to develop a new socially intelligent semi-autonomous telepresence system.

by   -   February 1, 2017

Coupled with audio and vital-sign data, this deep-learning, wearable system could someday serve as a “social coach” for people with anxiety or Asperger’s

by   -   February 1, 2017

Brad Knox talks bots_alive and a new form of character AI. Much like motion capture for scripted animation, this new technique may revolutionize how interactive characters are created, through observation of authentic human-generated behavior.

by   -   January 30, 2017

A Harvard team quantifies significant metabolic energy savings gained from its wearable gait-improving robot

Crocodile with young in her mouth. Uganda  - (C) John Downer Productions - Photographer: Richard Jones
Crocodile with young in her mouth. Uganda – (C) John Downer Productions – Photographer: Richard Jones

Tune in and watch Spy in the Wild on BBC 1 on Thursday 26 January at 20:00 GMT to see NCCR Robotics’ newest robot in action.

by   -   January 24, 2017
A new system called Data Civilizer automatically finds connections among many different data tables and allows users to perform database-style queries across all of them. The results of the queries can then be saved as new, orderly data sets that may draw information from dozens or even thousands of different tables.
A new system called Data Civilizer automatically finds connections among many different data tables and allows users to perform database-style queries across all of them. The results of the queries can then be saved as new, orderly data sets that may draw information from dozens or even thousands of different tables.

The age of big data has seen a host of new techniques for analyzing large data sets. But before any of those techniques can be applied, the target data has to be aggregated, organized, and cleaned up.

That turns out to be a shockingly time-consuming task. In a 2016 survey, 80 data scientists told the company CrowdFlower that, on average, they spent 80 percent of their time collecting and organizing data and only 20 percent analyzing it.

Thosha Moodley visits Decos’ futuristic development lab and is greeted by a familiar face: Softbank’s Pepper robot, newly employed as a receptionist.

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