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by   -   December 1, 2016
Tomaso Poggio, a professor of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and director of the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines, has long thought that the brain must produce “invariant” representations of faces and other objects, meaning representations that are indifferent to objects’ orientation in space, their distance from the viewer, or their location in the visual field. Image Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Image: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT researchers and their colleagues have developed a new computational model of the human brain’s face-recognition mechanism that seems to capture aspects of human neurology that previous models have missed.

The use of robotic tutors in primary school classrooms is one step closer according to research recently published in the open access journal Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.

interview by   -   October 31, 2016

Kids learn the basics of locomotion through a robot simulation game.

by   -   October 7, 2016

Romy Mueller interviews Raheeb Muzaffar who has developed a framework that improves the transmission of videos between moving drones and mobile devices at ground level.

interview by   -   September 17, 2016

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In this episode, Ron Vanderkley interviews Jürgen “Juxi” Leitner, a researcher at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Robots Vision in the Queensland University of Technology in Australia. Leitner speaks about a system being developed for the Google Lunar XPrize, called LunaRoo.

by   -   February 22, 2016

Last week Raffaello D’Andrea, professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) and founder of Verity Studios, demonstrated a whole series of novel flying machines live on stage at TED2016: From a novel Tail-Sitter (a small, fixed-wing aircraft that can optimally recover a stable flight position after a disturbance and smoothly transition from hover into forward flight and back), to the “Monospinner” (the world’s mechanically simplest flying machine, with only a single moving part), to the “Omnicopter” (the world’s first flying machine that can move into any direction independent of its orientation and its rotation), to a novel fully redundant quadrocopter (the world’s first, consisting of two separate two-propeller flying machines), to a synthetic swarm (33 flying machines swarming above the audience).

by   -   October 30, 2015

Cannybots are smart toy cars that introduce kids to programming, 3D-printing, robotics and AI, through play. They can be controlled and programmed from a phone or tablet to drive around, or to play fun games like Sumobot wrestling.

by   -   October 8, 2015
Learning how to solder at the Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire.
Learning how to solder at the Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire.

As advancements to how we approach STEM education and initiatives are on the rise around science, engineering and mathematics, we’re seeing a greater impact on how we recognize children’s development and understanding of now-vital tech skills, robotics will continue to play an important role.

interview by   -   September 18, 2015

Transcript below

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews M. Bernardine Dias, Associate Research Professor at the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, about TechBridgeWorld. TechBridgeWorld in an organization, founded by Dias, that develops technology to help serve developing communities. This interview focuses on a device that helps the blind learn to write. 

interview by   -   August 21, 2015

Transcript included.

In this episode, Ron Vanderkley speaks with Dr. Eleanor Sandry of Curtin University about her new book Robots and Communication. In the interview, we explore human to animal communication and what we can learn from it; human to humanoid robots interaction; and human to non-humanoid robots interactions. Also, we discuss Western and Eastern perceptions of robotics.

by   -   June 4, 2015

ThymioII_wireless

Thymio is a playful robot designed to help children discover programming, motors, light and motion sensors, and ultimately, logical and inventive thinking – right out of the box. Earlier versions of Thymio are already in use at home or school by tens of thousands of children worldwide. Now Thymio’s development team is crowdfunding to bring you a wireless version of this loveable educational robot. 

by   -   February 9, 2015

ConnectEd

At ConnectEd Studios we had the pleasure of visiting the workshop of Marek Michalowski, a co-founder of BeatBots. BeatBots is the robotic design studio behind the Keepon, and creates dynamic robotic characters for therapy, research, education, and entertainment.

interview by   -   February 6, 2015

Richard_Cassinis_VirtualWorlds

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Professor Riccardo Cassinis from the University of Brescia in Italy about using robotics in education. Cassinis speaks about having children, from primary school through university, access and control robots remotely to learn subjects such as programming, geography, and foreign languages.

by   -   December 3, 2014

1.Mobile App & Board

GraspIO is part hardware and part software, and gives everyone an easy way to build electronics projects using smartphones and tablets. It’s the world’s first DIY electronics platform with easy-to-use drag and drop programming mobile app. Launching soon on Kickstarter, sign up at www.graspio.com to get early bird offers when we go live.

by   -   November 4, 2014

wigl_closeup

Meet Wigl! Wigl is an interactive educational robot with a musical ear. We’ve launched our Indiegogo campaign for Wigl, the first musical robot buddy for kids. Wigl is controlled by musical notes through instruments such as a recorder, guitar, fiddle, and even a singer’s voice! By sequencing notes together, like lines of code in a program, children can make Wigl dance and even uncover secret dances. This fusion of right brain creativity with left brain logic engages children and promotes cross-disciplinary learning.





The Open Academic Robot Kit
October 16, 2015


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