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Víctor Mayoral Vilches offers a concise overview what’s happened and what’s coming next in the world of robotics

Whether or not an artificial intelligence (AI) ought to be granted patent rights is a timely dilemma given the increasing proliferation of AI in the workplace. Ronald Yu discusses.

by   -   February 16, 2017

The Amazon is home to thousands of local indigenous communities spread across very remote areas. As a result, these sparsely populated communities rarely have reliable access to essential medicines and public health services. Local doctors in the region of Contamana report an average of 45 snakebites per month and no rapid access to antivenom, for example. We recently traveled to the rainforest to learn more about these challenges, and to explore whether cargo drones (UAVs) could realistically be used to overcome some of these problems in a sustainable manner.

by   -   February 9, 2017

In these snappy tutorials, Robo-vlogger Philip English (a.k.a. “Robo-Phil”) introduces a method of programming your NAO robot how to walk and talk using Python.

by   -   February 1, 2017

Brad Knox talks bots_alive and a new form of character AI. Much like motion capture for scripted animation, this new technique may revolutionize how interactive characters are created, through observation of authentic human-generated behavior.

IEEE-main-AI-ethics-2016
Image: IEEE

On the 15th November 2016, the IEEE’s AI and Ethics Summit posed the question: “Who does the thinking?” In a series of key-note speeches and lively panel discussions, leading technologists, legal thinkers, philosophers, social scientists, manufacturers and policy makers considered such issues as:

  • The social, technological and philosophical questions orbiting AI.
  • Proposals to program ethical algorithms with human values to machines.
  • The social implications of the applications of AI.
by   -   January 20, 2017

world-economic-forum-2017-theresa-may

The population of the scenic ski-resort Davos, nestled in the Swiss Alps, swelled by nearly +3,000 people between the 17th and 20th of January. World leaders, academics, business tycoons, press and interlopers of all varieties were drawn to the 2017 World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual Meeting. The WEF is the foremost creative force for engaging the world’s top leaders in collaborative activities to shape the global, regional and industry agendas for the coming year and beyond. Perhaps unsurprisingly given recent geopolitical events, the theme of this year’s forum was Responsive and Responsible Leadership.

by   -   January 16, 2017

machine-learning-2

In this fascinating animation from Oxford Sparks, we take a look at how statistics and computer science can be used to make machines that learn for themselves, without being explicitly programmed.

by   -   January 13, 2017

arm_illustrationSo – you’ve built a robot arm. Now you’ve got to figure out how to control the thing. This was the situation I found myself in a few months ago, during my Masters project, and it’s a problem common to any robotic application: you want to put the end (specifically, the “end effector”) of your robot arm in a certain place, and to do that you have to figure out a valid pose for the arm which achieves that. This problem is called inverse kinematics (IK), and it’s one of the key problems in robotics.

Join Professor Brian Cox as he brings together experts on AI and machine learning (including RoboHub’s own Sabine Hauert) to discuss key issues that will shape our technological future

QuadBot-crab

Robotics is becoming more accessible for many people, but the complexities of legged robots mean they remain beyond the reach of most consumers. The complex mechanics, electronics and code algorithms make these robots much more difficult to simply get working. Four legged robots are especially difficult, they might seem very stable but simply lifting a leg up can cause the robot to fall.

QuadBot is an open-source, 3D printed robot that aims to change this.

by   -   December 1, 2016
Tomaso Poggio, a professor of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and director of the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines, has long thought that the brain must produce “invariant” representations of faces and other objects, meaning representations that are indifferent to objects’ orientation in space, their distance from the viewer, or their location in the visual field. Image Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Image: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT researchers and their colleagues have developed a new computational model of the human brain’s face-recognition mechanism that seems to capture aspects of human neurology that previous models have missed.

The use of robotic tutors in primary school classrooms is one step closer according to research recently published in the open access journal Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.

interview by   -   October 31, 2016

Kids learn the basics of locomotion through a robot simulation game.

Romy Mueller interviews Raheeb Muzaffar who has developed a framework that improves the transmission of videos between moving drones and mobile devices at ground level.





Mobility Transformation Facility
November 28, 2014


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