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Research

by   -   January 10, 2017

New technique uses biomaterials to make complex devices that could be used for many implantable applications, including drug delivery and stents, and could lead to advances in precision medicine

interview by   -   January 7, 2017

imageedit_3_7647357799

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Domenico Prattichizzo, Professor of Robotics at the University of Siena and Senior Scientist at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Genova in Italy, about a device for assisting people who have lost the use of one of their hands, for example by a stroke. The device is an extra finger that functions to press an object into the paralyzed hand so that it can be grasped.

by   -   January 5, 2017
Image: Clearpath
Image: Clearpath

Sriram Narasimhan’s research team are shaking things up in the Civil Engineering Structures Lab at the University of Waterloo. The research, which is led by Ph.D Candidate Kevin Goorts, is developing a new mobile damping system for suppressing unwanted vibrations in lightweight, flexible bridges. Whereas damping systems are often permanent fixtures built into the bridge, their system is designed to be adaptable, autonomous, and better suited for rapid, temporary deployment.

by   -   December 19, 2016
In 2016, MIT CSAIL researchers worked on a range of projects in robotics, theory, wireless technology, software systems, and other disciplines. Image: CSAIL
In 2016, MIT CSAIL researchers worked on a range of projects in robotics, theory, wireless technology, software systems, and other disciplines. Image: CSAIL

Machines that predict the future, robots that patch wounds and wireless emotion-detectors are just a few of the exciting projects that came out of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) this year. Here’s a sampling of 16 highlights from 2016 that span the many computer science disciplines that make up CSAIL.

by   -   December 16, 2016

System correlates recorded speech with images, could lead to fully automated speech recognition.

by   -   December 5, 2016
PhD student Tao Du watching the bunnycopter take off . Image credit: Jason Dorfman, MIT CSAIL
PhD student Tao Du watching the bunnycopter take off . Image credit: Jason Dorfman, MIT CSAIL

This fall’s new FAA regulations have made drone flight easier than ever for both companies and consumers. But what if the drones out on the market aren’t exactly what you want?

A new system from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) is the first to allow users to design, simulate and build their own custom drone. Users can change the size, shape and structure of their drone based on the specific needs they have for payload, cost, flight time, battery usage and other factors.

by   -   December 1, 2016
Tomaso Poggio, a professor of brain and cognitive sciences at MIT and director of the Center for Brains, Minds, and Machines, has long thought that the brain must produce “invariant” representations of faces and other objects, meaning representations that are indifferent to objects’ orientation in space, their distance from the viewer, or their location in the visual field. Image Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Image: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MIT researchers and their colleagues have developed a new computational model of the human brain’s face-recognition mechanism that seems to capture aspects of human neurology that previous models have missed.

interview by   -   November 26, 2016

wetlab

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Dieter Fox, Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington, about the 100/100 Computer Vision Tracking Challenge. This is a self-imposed challenge to understand 100% of the pixels in an image 100% of the time in video footage; this includes understanding semantic information. Such understanding would allow robots to assist humans more naturally in environments like a home kitchen, wet lab, or in disaster response. To accomplish this challenge, Fox discusses challenges which include modeling, tracking, and detecting articulated objects.

by   -   November 19, 2016

By Ethan Bilby.

Field robots and plane-based remote sensors can patrol the earth and the sky to monitor the gases that cause climate change. Standing on three large wheels that help it avoid getting stuck in the soil, the Field Flux robot is able to lower two sampling chambers held on large arms to test soils for tiny amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O).

by   -   November 16, 2016

bc-robot-interface

Research and development of robotic assistive technologies has gained tremendous momentum in the last decade due to several factors such as the maturity level reached by several technologies, the advances in robotics and AI and the fact that more than 700 million of persons have some kind of disability or handicap. For many people with mobility impairments, essential and simple tasks, such as dressing or feeding, require the assistance of dedicated people. Thus, the use of devices providing independent mobility can have a large impact on their quality of life.

by   -   November 14, 2016

Developed at Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, “MoVR” system allows VR headsets to communicate without a cord.

interview by   -   November 12, 2016

ori-2-bedroom-bed-in-1000x667
In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Hasier Larrea, Founder and CEO of Ori Systems and MSc candidate at the MIT Media Lab, about robotics used to transform personal spaces. Larrea discusses how the world is urbanizing and how new space paradigms are needed to accommodate this shift. He proposes robotic furniture that allows for what is not being used to be hidden, such as a desk or a bed. Larrea discusses the robotic systems, how these systems will be integrated into existing infrastructure, and the future or Ori Systems.

by   -   November 11, 2016

“Information extraction” system helps turn plain text into data for statistical analysis.

by   -   November 10, 2016

Self-driving scooter demonstrated at MIT complements autonomous golf carts and city cars.

by and   -   November 8, 2016

What can swarm roboticists learn from policy makers, systems biologists and physicists, and vice versa? It is already widely recognised that Robotics is an inherently interdisciplinary field and that designing even a single robot might require input from multiple domains. In Swarm Robotics, interactions between robots add further layers of complexity.





Venture capital in robotics
August 23, 2013


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